RGI FIGHT FOR INFECTION PREVENTION

TSRThe survey was undertaken after the 2009 HN1 flu epidemic, and of the five populations studied by Boston Harvard, Britons were consistently shown to be the nation least likely to pay attention to basic rules of hygiene, such as washing hands and sneezing into a tissue. Hitting the headlines recently was the news that Britons were the ”least hygienic during the swine flu outbreak” following the recent survey published in the Lancet medical journal.

Therefore to highlight the importance of ongoing education on infection prevention, October shines a light on both MRSA World Awareness Month and Infection Prevention week (14th-20th October 2012).

One such infection, Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, or MRSA, is a common bacterium that normally lives on human skin surfaces. A staggering 30-40% of us carry permanent colonies of these bugs, but never get infected and have no idea that we are carrying them, thus becoming carriers.

In much the same way as you can catch a common cold, Staph Aureus can be spread from person to person by touching contaminated objects and surfaces such as door handles, counter tops, mobiles, laundry, TV remotes and even via the air you breathe.

In a healthy carrier the risk of developing an infection can be considered low. However some individuals are at greater risk of contracting an infection if MRSA is given a pathway into the body, via the mouth, nose, eyes, surgical sites, cuts or wounds, making MRSA especially contagious in hospitals and healthcare facilities.

Whilst your immune system may do just fine dealing with 1,000,000 MRSA bacteria per square inch in your nose, your 85-year old grandmother, 6-month old infant or cancer-fighting friend may not be so lucky.

Furthermore, MRSA is just the tip of the iceberg.

Every year at least 300,000 patients develop a Healthcare Acquired Infection (HCAI), such as C diff or Norovirus, and it is estimated that around 1 in 10 patients pick up an infection during their stay in a UK hospital. On average, patients with an HCAI have been found to be around 7 times more likely to die in hospital than uninfected patients.

To date, millions of pounds have been spent within UK hospitals to combat the risks of HCAIS, resulting in an increase in key infection control practices by staff to reduce the spread of infection.

One key control is frequent and effective hand washing, which has been shown to be effective in reducing the risk of cross contamination between staff and patients on wards. Another measure is the isolation of infected patients, who can then be treated without posing the threat of infection spreading throughout the ward.

However, whilst the aim is to isolate patients, one of the challenges faced today is the lack of single side rooms or designated isolation wards within hospitals.

Working in collaboration with DH and NHS, RGi were able to understand the clinical needs required to design a breakthrough isolation concept, known as the Temporary Side Room (TSR) as a solution in effective infection prevention in hospitals.

The TSR reduces transmission by physical contact, by airborne transmission and by improving the infection control procedure, yet creates an effective barrier around the patient.

The TSR has been designed with patient comfort, dignity and privacy in mind, whilst also allowing good visibility for observation by staff.

It is simple, quick and easy to erect in any healthcare environment, and is easy to clean using best materials technology. The TSR also features a fully integrated air filtration system, and its own self contained hand wash station with a traffic light system on the entry door, to remind staff and visitors to wash their hands.

The Temporary Side Room offers significant benefit to hospitals, patients and staff to reduce infection; however we all need to understand how we can play our part too.

Did you know that a third of infections are brought into hospitals via the community?

It is therefore paramount that everyone practices good hand washing hygiene within the healthcare environment, as well as outside in the community.

According to US researchers at the University of Colorado, the average person’s hands probably carry at least 3,000 different bacteria belonging to more than 100 species, and there is increasing evidence that MRSA contagious bacteria is becoming a serious and growing problem in community settings such as in gyms, prisons and schools.

Hitting the headlines recently was the news that Britons were the ”least hygienic during the swine flu outbreak” following the recent survey published in the Lancet medical journal.

The survey was undertaken after the 2009 HN1 flu epidemic, and of the five populations studied by Boston Harvard, Britons were consistently shown to be the nation least likely to pay attention to basic rules of hygiene, such as washing hands and sneezing into a tissue.

Therefore to highlight the importance of ongoing education on infection prevention, October shines a light on both MRSA World Awareness Month and Infection Prevention week (14th-20th October 2012).

One such infection, Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, or MRSA, is a common bacterium that normally lives on human skin surfaces. A staggering 30-40% of us carry permanent colonies of these bugs, but never get infected and have no idea that we are carrying them, thus becoming carriers.

In much the same way as you can catch a common cold, Staph Aureus can be spread from person to person by touching contaminated objects and surfaces such as door handles, counter tops, mobiles, laundry, TV remotes and even via the air you breathe.

In a healthy carrier the risk of developing an infection can be considered low. However some individuals are at greater risk of contracting an infection if MRSA is given a pathway into the body, via the mouth, nose, eyes, surgical sites, cuts or wounds, making MRSA especially contagious in hospitals and healthcare facilities.

Whilst your immune system may do just fine dealing with 1,000,000 MRSA bacteria per square inch in your nose, your 85-year old grandmother, 6-month old infant or cancer-fighting friend may not be so lucky.

Furthermore, MRSA is just the tip of the iceberg.

Every year at least 300,000 patients develop a Healthcare Acquired Infection (HCAI), such as C diff or Norovirus, and it is estimated that around 1 in 10 patients pick up an infection during their stay in a UK hospital. On average, patients with an HCAI have been found to be around 7 times more likely to die in hospital than uninfected patients.

To date, millions of pounds have been spent within UK hospitals to combat the risks of HCAIS, resulting in an increase in key infection control practices by staff to reduce the spread of infection.

One key control is frequent and effective hand washing, which has been shown to be effective in reducing the risk of cross contamination between staff and patients on wards. Another measure is the isolation of infected patients, who can then be treated without posing the threat of infection spreading throughout the ward.

However, whilst the aim is to isolate patients, one of the challenges faced today is the lack of single side rooms or designated isolation wards within hospitals.

Working in collaboration with DH and NHS, RGi were able to understand the clinical needs required to design a breakthrough isolation concept, known as the Temporary Side Room (TSR) as a solution in effective infection prevention in hospitals.

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